TEACHING HISTORY, TEACHING PEACE?

OHTE Annual Conference 2023
30Nov 1dec
Strasbourg
& Online

Programme

09:00 – 10:30

Opening session: "Teaching history, teaching peace?”

Replay

The Observatory on History Teaching in Europe is an intrinsic part of the framework of priorities and values defended by the Council of Europe (and the conclusions of the Reykjavík Summit), which it supports by drafting and publishing reports on the way in which history is taught in its member states. History enables us to understand the world around us, to learn about our identities and to open up to others through the knowledge we acquire – but does teaching history really guarantee peace?

The Observatory on History Teaching in Europe is an intrinsic part of the framework of priorities and values defended by the Council of Europe (and the conclusions of the Reykjavík Summit), which it supports by drafting and publishing reports on the way in which history is taught in its member states. History enables us to understand the world around us, to learn about our identities and to open up to others through the knowledge we acquire – but does teaching history really guarantee peace?

MODERATION

Annette GERLACH, Journalist and TV host, ARTE, France

OPENING WORDS

Bjørn BERGE, Deputy Secretary General of the Council of Europe – Video message
Helen LOREZ-SCHWEIG, Deputy Permanent Representative of Liechtenstein to the Council of Europe, on behalf of the Liechtenstein Presidency of the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe

PANEL

Holly CASE, Professor of History, Brown University, Rhode Island, United States of America
Josep DALLERÈS CODINA, Member of the Council of Europe High-Level Reflection Group, Andorra
Alain LAMASSOURE, Chair of the Governing Board of the Observatory on History Teaching in Europe (OHTE), France
Pap NDIAYE, Ambassador and Permanent Representative of France to the Council of Europe
Ms Aleksandra ROMANTSOVA, Executive Director of the Centre for Civil Liberties (Nobel Peace Prize 2022), Ukraine – Online

11:00 – 12:30

OHTE Talk - Timothy GARTON ASH: “Can young Europeans learn from the history of their ‘Homelands’?”

Replay

Professor of European Studies, University of Oxford, United Kingdom.
Followed by a debate with participants moderated by Matjaž GRUDEN, Director of Democratic Participation, Council of Europe.

12:45 – 13:45
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Press Conference

ASK FOR THE PRESS KIT
14:00 – 15:30

Plenary Session 1: "The state of history teaching in Europe: what can we learn from it?"

Replay

The Observatory on History Teaching in Europe presents its first General Report on the state of history teaching in Europe, the result of a long and comprehensive process overseen by the OHTE’s Scientific Advisory Council to guarantee its quality. Taking as its starting point the place of history in education systems, the Report also covers a wide range of aspects, such as the structure, content and teaching methods used in the member states. It therefore aims to present in detail the ways in which history is taught in the member states and encourage stakeholders to take an interest in the practices employed. This panel is an opportunity to take stock of the work carried out throughout the creation of the report, its scientific and methodological approach, and its main conclusions.

The Observatory on History Teaching in Europe presents its first General Report on the state of history teaching in Europe, the result of a long and comprehensive process overseen by the OHTE’s Scientific Advisory Council to guarantee its quality. Taking as its starting point the place of history in education systems, the Report also covers a wide range of aspects, such as the structure, content and teaching methods used in the member states. It therefore aims to present in detail the ways in which history is taught in the member states and encourage stakeholders to take an interest in the practices employed. This panel is an opportunity to take stock of the work carried out throughout the creation of the report, its scientific and methodological approach, and its main conclusions.

MODERATION

Raul CÂRSTOCEA, Lecturer in European History, Maynooth University (Ireland) and Vice-Chair of the OHTE Scientific Advisory Council

PANEL

Stéphane LÉVESQUE, Vice-Dean for Research and Professional Development, Faculty of Education, University of Ottawa, Canada
Olena PALKO, Assistant Professor of History, University of Basel, Switzerland
Marko ŠUICA, Historian, Teacher, Textbook Author, University of Belgrade (Serbia) and member of the OHTE Scientific Advisory Council
Marie-Claire TUITE, Vice President of the History Teachers’ Association of Ireland, Assistant Principal, Dominican College Muckross Park, Ireland

15:30 – 16:45

Plenary session 2: "History teachers, teachers of peace?”

Replay

Being a history teacher is often a vocation because the subject has an important social dimension, with the demands of education authorities and the reality of the classroom constantly having to be balanced. Moreover, this mission must ensure that the history taught allows all students to find themselves represented and included in the learning process. Finally, since the end of the Second World War in Europe, history teaching has been closely linked to remembrance and the promotion of peace on the continent. What is the reality of this? How do teachers see themselves and their mission? Do they teach history to teach peace, or is this merely an unattainable dream?

Being a history teacher is often a vocation because the subject has an important social dimension, with the demands of education authorities and the reality of the classroom constantly having to be balanced. Moreover, this mission must ensure that the history taught allows all students to find themselves represented and included in the learning process. Finally, since the end of the Second World War in Europe, history teaching has been closely linked to remembrance and the promotion of peace on the continent. What is the reality of this? How do teachers see themselves and their mission? Do they teach history to teach peace, or is this merely an unattainable dream?

MODERATION

Chara MAKRIYIANNI, History Educator (Cyprus) and Chair of the OHTE Scientific Advisory Council

PANEL

Alan McCULLY, Teacher educator and researcher, University of Ulster (United Kingdom) and member of the OHTE Scientific Advisory Council
Jolan REMCSAK, History teacher at the Lycée Gustave Eiffel, Mayotte, France
Ana RADAKOVIĆ, Vice-President of Education for the 21st Century, PhD student in History didactics, University of Belgrade, Serbia
Steven STEGERS, Executive Director, EuroClio – European Association of History Educators, The Hague, The Netherlands and Member of the Expert Group on the OHTE General Report on the State of History Teaching in Europe

17:15 – 18:30

Plenary Session 3: "History on the page: what future for history textbooks?”

Replay

It is never easy to come to terms with one’s own history, whether personal, regional or national – especially if it carries with it immense ramifications that extend over several centuries and beyond national or European borders. Even in spite of increased access to information in the digital age, history teaching can remain a response to this daunting situation, with textbooks and other educational resources serving to reflect these stories. How are textbooks written? What choices and dilemmas do we face? How do we ensure that we tell the ‘right’ story? This panel of history, didactics and education professionals will offer their views on the subject.

It is never easy to come to terms with one’s own history, whether personal, regional or national – especially if it carries with it immense ramifications that extend over several centuries and beyond national or European borders. Even in spite of increased access to information in the digital age, history teaching can remain a response to this daunting situation, with textbooks and other educational resources serving to reflect these stories. How are textbooks written? What choices and dilemmas do we face? How do we ensure that we tell the ‘right’ story? This panel of history, didactics and education professionals will offer their views on the subject.

MODERATION

Steffen SAMMLER, Historian, Georg-Eckert-Institut (Leibniz Institute for Educational Media) and lecturer at the Technical University of Braunschweig, Germany

PANEL

François DA ROCHA CARNEIRO, Vice-President of the Association of French History and Geography Teachers and History Teacher at the Lycée Jean-Moulin, Roubaix, France
Igor KĄKOLEWSKI, Professor of History at the University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Poland
Dilek LATİF, Member of the Association for Historical Dialogue and Research, (Cyprus) and member of the OHTE Expert Group on the OHTE General Report on the state of history teaching in Europe

09:00 – 10:15

OHTE Talk - Arthur CHAPMAN, “Why does history education matter?"

Replay

Professor of History Education, Institute of Education, University College London, UK

Followed by a debate with the participants moderated by Villano QIRIAZI, Head of the Education Department, Council of Europe.

10:45 – 12:15

Plenary Session 4: "Young people are not interested in history: deconstructing a myth”

Replay

How many times have we heard that young people are not interested in history, or, on the contrary, that young people themselves claim that history is not their favourite school subject? Despite these stereotypical narratives and preconceived ideas, it is in fact understood that history is an important subject for young people, at a time when national and cultural reference points are being disrupted, and when each person, in their quest for identity, is looking for answers in (or through?) history. New technologies and social networks are also becoming platforms for learning, where even the most advanced forms of teaching come up against malicious manipulations. Who better to talk about these subjects than young people themselves?

How many times have we heard that young people are not interested in history, or, on the contrary, that young people themselves claim that history is not their favourite school subject? Despite these stereotypical narratives and preconceived ideas, it is in fact understood that history is an important subject for young people, at a time when national and cultural reference points are being disrupted, and when each person, in their quest for identity, is looking for answers in (or through?) history. New technologies and social networks are also becoming platforms for learning, where even the most advanced forms of teaching come up against malicious manipulations. Who better to talk about these subjects than young people themselves?

MODERATION

Aurora AILINCĂI, Executive Director of the Observatory on History Teaching in Europe, Council of Europe

PANEL

Anastasiia BRUCHA, Winner of the 2023 HISTOLAB Award, Ukraine
Sara COSTA FEIO, Student, NOVA School of Social Sciences and Humanities, Portugal
Isabelle PRELIPCEANU, Graduate of the BA International Relations and Global Development Studies, School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), United Kingdom
Marius SCHLAGETER, Board Member of the European Movement Germany, Graduate of the MA International Studies: Peace and Conflict Studies, Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany
Lauren PRAY, Human Rights and Solidarity Coordinator, European Students’ Union, Czech Republic

12:15 – 13:00

Closing session

Replay
MODERATION

Annette GERLACH, Journalist and TV host, ARTE

CONFERENCE REPORT

Justine VIZIER, Student in International Relations, Sciences Po Strasbourg
Joseph PEYRELONGUE, Student in International Relations, Sciences Po Strasbourg

CLOSING PANEL

Vesna BATISTIĆ KOS, Ambassador, Head of the European Union Delegation to the Council of Europe Ambassador and Permanent Representative of Georgia to the Council of Europe
Tobias FLESSENKEMPER, Head of the Youth Department, Council of Europe
Irena KRASNICKA, Head of the OSCE Documentation Centre in Prague
Alain LAMASSOURE, Chair of the Governing Board of the Observatory on History Teaching in Europe
Lydia RUPRECHT, Global Citizenship Education team leader and programme specialist, UNESCO
Tamar TALIASHVILI, Ambassador and Permanent Representative of Georgia to the Council of Europe, Chair of the Rapporteur Group on Education, Culture, Sport, Youth and Environment (GR-C), Council of Europe

Featured OHTE talks

“Can young Europeans learn from the history of their ‘Homelands’?”

by Timoty GARTON ASH, Professor of European Studies, Oxford University
Followed by a debate with participants moderated by Matjaž GRUDEN, Director of Democratic Participation, Council of Europe

"Why history education matters?"

by Arthur CHAPMAN, Professor in History in Education at the UCL Institute of Education, University College London
Followed by a debate with the participants moderated by Villano QIRIAZI, Head of the Education Department, Council of Europe

GLIMPSES FROM THE CONFERENCE

#LearnersFirst

Young people at the heart
of the OHTE Annual Conference

Download below the “Council of Europe education strategy 2030”

Download

OHTE general report

This first general report, produced by the Council of Europe’s Observatory on History Teaching in Europe (OHTE) presents a snapshot of the state of history teaching in Europe.

Speakers Programme